Word from Gazon

Souvenir shopping in Normandy

Posted by

Souvenir shopping in Normandy

Shopping for Souvenirs and Gifts in Normandy: ‘Achats Plaisir’ When it’s time to go home , why not spend a half day shopping for memories…  (Picture of a shop in Honfleur by Paul Indigo on 500px.com) FOOD Cheese: Supermarkets and also local producers e.g. Graindorge (at Livarot, 14140) Cider: Supermarkets and also local producers e.g. La ferme du Bisson (61210 Bazoches au Houlme) Calvados: Supermarkets & also local producers e.g. Calvados Dupont ( Victot-Pontfol 14430) Wine & Liqueurs: Supermarkets – Take a look at sparkling Loire wines such as Saumur & Vouvray which...

Read More

The Normandy Beaches in One day

Posted by

The Normandy Beaches in One day

Remembering the 2,052,299 Allied Troops who came ashore following D-Day: 6th June 1944. If you only have one day, I’d spend it entirely on the exciting sites and upgraded museums along the beaches, and if you want to squeeze in the excellent Caen Memorial Museum,visit it on your way to or from the beaches (– but remember that the American Cemetery at Colleville closes at 18:00 May- Sept and and 17:00 Oct- April) – and you need at least 1.5 hrs. there. If you’re travelling by car, begin on the cliffs above Arromanches and see the movie at the Arromanches 360 Theater to set your mood. Walk or...

Read More

Cycling ‘en famille’ in Normandy

Posted by

Cycling ‘en famille’ in Normandy

FAMILY CYCLING HOLIDAY RESOURCES Normandy is good for cycling – there are varied types of landscapes to explore, the roads are quiet and motorists respectful of cyclists. We are near FALAISE on the border of 2 departements – Calvados & the Orne . For dedicated cycling routes I would recommend 3 Voie Vertes – in the region: Map of Voies Vertes (Greenways)  in Calvados Calvados by bike Brochure: 2 closest greenways to the Haras.  Route Numbers 11 & 12 pp22-24. (The Mezidon- Canon to Lisores section of the Véloroute Côte Fleurie Pays D’Auge. Also the Voie Verte de L’Ante Falaise to...

Read More

It’s Easy & Fun to go to Paris for the Day!

Posted by

It’s Easy & Fun to go to Paris for the Day!

It’s a great idea to go to Paris for the day – (we don’t get time to go often enough!) It’s really easy. For a day’s sightseeing, think about an early start – the 07.17 from Argentan arrives in Paris at 09.16. Or go for lunch: the 10.19 arrives in Paris at 12.05. Or for dinner and maybe stay over a night: the 16.23 will get you there by 18.05. You can find the train timetable for Argentan – our local station- to Paris Montparnasse at http://www.voyages-sncf.com/#. The train times are on average about every 1 .5 to   2 hours. The journey time is about 2 hours- more or...

Read More

Restaurant Recommendations – Où manger le dimanche?

Posted by

Restaurant Recommendations – Où manger le dimanche?

RESTAURANT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUNDAYS & MONDAYS Many local restaurants are closed on Sunday & Monday evenings. These are our recommendations of those that are usually open. (Distances & driving times are from the Haras du Gazon.) Click on the links for more information. It’s always worthwhile calling to reserve a table, even if you do this on the same day. You tend to get a warmer welcome and you can confirm that the restaurant isn’t closed e.g. for annual holidays, random other circumstances etc.   OPEN SUNDAYS   Le Lion Verd at Putanges 9kms/5 miles.  12 minute drive...

Read More

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy Remembered

Posted by

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy Remembered

D-DAY LANDINGS  &  the  BATTLE OF NORMANDY MEMORIAL SITES.          1944:  Le bel été de la Libération   On June 6 every year and for 100 days after, there are very many events commemorating that day in 1944 when the Allies started their long planned invasion of German occupied France. The ensuing Battle of Normandy continued until the end of August when Allied troops crossed the Seine and entered Paris. Falaise, our local town, was liberated on August 16, 1944. Neuvy au Houlme, our village, was liberated at 8am GMT on August 20, 1944, (after 4 years of German Occupation), by the...

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest